Medical Fund

 

“We’ve had a rough start from neglect and abuse, but we’re safe, warm, and loved now. Our friends at GDFRL are going to help us get healthy too!”

The medical cases below are cases for which we need help to pay for medical bills. They vary in severity from deadly heart worms to urgent injuries requiring surgery. Each dog has been evaluated by veterinarians and will get their happy ending! They will all go on to live normal, comfortable lives, but the expenses to get them there can be steep. All donations are tax-deductible.

Davin

1780696_729848007052162_6677770783537596886_nDavin came from a local animal shelter and was in very poor condition. At only 90 lbs, he was about 40 lbs underweight, had severe demodex mange, a bad staph infection on his skin, and bloody diarrhea. We think he is about 4 yrs old. He’s missing a couple molars on each side which is why his tongue hangs out, but the teeth he does have are in pretty good shape.

We promptly got him to a vet, and after being on a couple of antibiotics for his infection, eyes drops for his eyes, Ivermectin to kill the demodex, and a prescription diet to settle down his GI tract, he’s MUCH improved. The good news is that he does NOT have heart worms! We are pleasantly surprised!

It’s been a long road, but we’re thrilled to see our boy looking so much better! He was so good at the vet! He loved everyone and was all tail wags which is amazing for what this boy has been through and how bad he must have felt. He’s awesome!

Davin’s medical bills will total about $2000 by the time he’s healthy and ready for adoption. We appreciate donations of any size! Would you like to help?

 

Theo

Theosanctuary: a place of refuge or protection; a place where animals can live for the duration of their livesƒ

Theo is our “sanctuary dog”. He came into our rescue in 2012, surrendered by his owners, struggling with some painful health problems, but just as sweet and happy as could be.

Our vets diagnosed him with a spinal infection and severe degenerative arthritis in his hips and knees. We treated the infection and that cleared up nicely, but the arthritis will just be a matter of doing what we can for as long as we can to keep him feeling good each day.

Theo’s medical issues will be ongoing, and we don’t know how long his quality of life will last, but we are aware that the likelihood of him being adopted is very slim. He is happy and enjoys his days now, though, and that is all that matters to us! Great Dane Friends of Ruff Love is Theo’s sanctuary. He will remain within our rescue and will not lack for any medical or daily care for as long as he is happy. We’re committed to him, and we love him.

Because of his medical requirements to keep him from being in pain, we do have some monthly expenses that are associated with keeping him happy and comfortable. We’ve spent a lot of time with his veterinarian developing a plan for him and are seeing good results with water physical therapy, monthly injections of Adequan (which lubricates and provides relief to joints in the body), and some anti-inflammatories and joint supplements.

As a nonprofit organization, we rely solely on donations to support the medical care of our rescued dogs. If you’d like to contribute toward Theo’s medical care, we would truly appreciate it!

We have set up the option to make one-time donations or to make monthly donations. Those who set up recurring donations will receive a special thank you from Theo! You will see the price break-down of his monthly expenses, but feel free to donate any amount you choose. All donations are tax-deductible and immensely appreciated.

 

Heartworm Treatments

Heartworms are deadly. And here in the Southeastern region of the U.S. they are especially common because they are transmitted by mosquitoes. Very frequently, adult dogs come into our rescue with heartworms because their previous owners did not give them monthly heartworm prevention. It then falls to GDFRL to have them treated because we pledge to see to all the medical needs of dogs in our care.

Heartworms may not seem urgent, but they are! They infest the heart and blood vessels of the lungs which gradually kills animals. There are a couple of different treatment methods, and, together with our veterinarians, we choose whichever is most appropriate for a dog on an individual basis. Both options generally cost us no less than $500 per dog, and that cost is on the rise because the cost of the medications required for treatment has been increasing across the nation.

If you’d like to help us with the cost of treatment, we’d truly appreciate it! No donation is too small to help!